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Maria E. Vaccarino

October 19, 1951 ~ October 13, 2018 (age 66)
Maria Vaccarino (nee LaRosa), age 66, of Ridgewood, formerly of Brooklyn, NY, passed away Saturday, October 13, 2018, lovingly surrounded by her family after a long illness. She leaves behind beloved husband, James ‘Skip’ Vaccarino, daughter Debra Burns and husband Chris, son Jamie and wife Jackie (Mead), son Jonathan, and sister Esther DiPilato and husband Anthony. She also leaves behind her adoring grandchildren Harrison, Emily, Catherine, Natalie and Gavin, who she devoted so much time and energy into being the best “Mia” in the world! A very dedicated mother as well, Maria could always be seen on the sidelines of her children’s sporting events, and later her grandchildren’s sporting events, being the family Cheerleader. Every Holiday was a big celebration, filled with tradition. If there was any organizing needed, whether it be for a holiday, or other event, Maria would be there to help!

She was involved in Education for all of her professional life. First as a teacher in St. Francis Cabrini School in Brooklyn for many years, then as Assistant Admissions Director for Poly Prep Country Day School, also in Brooklyn.

Maria was a dog lover, especially her poodles. She also enjoyed listening to Frank Sinatra, Vic Damone, and other artists from that era. But her favorite song was her and Skips Wedding Song, “It’s Impossible” by Perry Como. A lifelong Catholic, she was a parishioner of St. Gabriel’s RC Church, Saddle River.

Visiting hours will be Thursday 4:00 – 9:00 PM at The Feeney Funeral Home, 232 Franklin Ave, Ridgewood. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated Friday 12:00 PM at St. Gabriel’s, with a private cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in Maria's name to Amyloidosis Research, Dr. Peter Gorevic, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Box 1244, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, would be greatly appreciated.


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